WAXING CRESCENTS, WANING GIBBOUS', FULL MOONS, NEW MOONS

Each moon phase is going to give you a very unique experience, and while a full, or nearly full moon will become a significant source of light pollution - especially on a frozen lake covered in snow - it can make a faint aurora seem harder to see, but you are still going to see the aurora during those near full moon phases. I promise you it doesn't disappear. So while the moon doesn't directly affect the aurora borealis itself, it will have a strong influence on your experience - never better or worse, just different.

Some of my favourite nights here are when the moon rise or moon set is halfway through the night (around midnight, since we typically leave for tour somewhere around 21:00 and return around 3:00), and you really get to experience both having the moon in the sky but also the darkness of just pure starlight. When we get into a photography mindset, it's really something spectacular to me. As moon begins come close to kissing the horizon, our beautifully quirky trees will cast long shadows across untouched snow on frozen lakes, and the moonlight will be very gentle and warm.  

MOONRISE, MOONSET, AND MOON PHASE GUIDE FOR YELLOWKNIFE

Moon

During a crescent moon, half moon, or full moon - you'll certainly be able to take notice of the way it can illuminate our beautiful landscapes, and provide absolutely unique aurora portrait opportunities here. 


Moonless

If you're a stargazer, then a new moon is the phase for you. Before the aurora floods us with light pollution you'd be crazy to complain about, we'll have the milky way towering over our heads along with a galaxy or two we'll be able to spot through some astronomy binoculars.